MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - SEPTEMBER 28: Jarryd Roughead and Lance Franklin of the Hawks celebrates with the Premiership Cup after the hawks won the 2013 AFL Grand Final match between the Hawthorn Hawks and the Fremantle Dockers at Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 28, 2013 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

With the 2020 season done and dusted, a new dynasty has been born in the form of the Tigers.

Winning the 2017, 2019 and 2020 premierships has meant that Damien Hardwick’s side are now in rare air and will forever be remembered as one of most elite sides of all time.

But how do they stack up against the other dominant sides of the century? Are they better or worse than Brisbane, Geelong or Hawthorn?

Here are our current rankings…

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4. Geelong (2007-11)

Some may be shocked to see this Cats side down the bottom, especially considering how frightening they were on their day.

This Geelong side won three flags in five seasons (2007, 2009 and 2011) under both Mark ‘Bomber’ Thompson and current coach Chris Scott.

They were packed to the brim with some of the greatest players of the modern era – Scarlett, Bartel, Johnson, Ablett, Selwood just to name a few.

Their three winning grand finals included a record 119 point embarrassment of Port Adelaide, a hard fought thriller against the Saints and a spirited victory against Collingwood.

However, the only thing holding them back from going higher is the fact that they never won consecutive flags.

In 2008 they made the decider but went down to the Hawks, and in 2010 they bowed out to Collingwood off the back of a 62 point half-time deficit in a preliminary final.

Aside from this, they were one of the most dominant sides to ever play and were unbeatable at their best.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – OCTOBER 01: Mitch Duncan and Corey Enright of the Cats celebrate with the Premiership Cup after winning the 2011 AFL Grand Final match between the Collingwood Magpies and the Geelong Cats at Melbourne Cricket Ground on October 1, 2011 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Mark Dadswell/Getty Images)
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