BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA - JULY 31: Luke Hodge looks on during a Brisbane Lions AFL training session at The Gabba on July 31, 2018 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Chris Hyde/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Veteran Luke Hodge has attacked Match Review Officer Michael Christian stating the current system is confusing and the AFL seem to be finding new ways to fine players.

After receiving a $2000 fine on Saturday night for engaging in rough conduct with Gold Coast Sun Alex Sexton, it left the four-time premiership winner fuming.

Hodge was fined for a tackle late in the contest between the two Queensland clubs, which the Match Review committee deemed careless with a low impact to the head.

Hodge explained to reporters he was surprised with the decision.

“I never thought I’d get fined for a tackle, especially when the bloke got up and kept playing,” Hodge said.

“That’s the frustrating thing for players, week to week the classification that gets judged is very inconsistent.

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“Sometimes they look at the medical report, sometimes they look at the action.

Hodge went on the say he completed the same tackle with the same motions only a few minutes earlier.

“They said it was because of the force. Three minutes to go and you’re up by seven points, you’ve got to take them to ground,” Hodge said.

“It’s confusing and frustrating sometimes.

“That’s the AFL, they’ll do what they want, and we’ll have to move on.”

When questioned on whether he’ll contest the fine he is so overly angried by, Hodge stated what even is the point?

“They pick and choose what they want to classify and you can’t really argue against them,” Hodge said.

“We can moan as much as we want but we just have to move on.

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“Hopefully they fix that because a lot of people get really frustrated.”

There is no denying Christian has one of the hardest jobs within the AFL, but Hodge believes the system is not producing what it was designed to do.

The system is in place to stop players from missing games due to low-level infringements but instead has turned into a fining feast in Hodges opinion.

“A tackle here and there and some other stuff, they’re looking to fine, it’s almost like, who can we get, how much can we fine them?” Hodge said.

“I think they made $26,000 this week, let’s hope that goes to charity and not back to the AFL.”